Vote of no confidence

Stay application hearing adjourned

The adjournment was sought by lawyers representing the Speaker and Clerk of Parliament, because they were unable to get instructions from the Speaker, who is said to be in his electorate.

The Opposition, although not a party in the Supreme Court Reference, also appeared through their lawyer Justin Wohuinangu, on instructions from Opposition Leader Patrick Pruaitch and Shadow Attorney General Kerenga Kua.

The Opposition is not a party because earlier, their application seeking to join in the Attorney General’s Supreme Court Reference was refused by the court.

State files VoNC stay motion

With the Vote of No Confidence motion filed by Opposition on May 7, the Attorney General, Alfred Manase, filed an application to ask the court to stay the VoNC motion from progressing.

“Yesterday I filed an urgent application in the Supreme Court, seeking an order to stay the Parliament and its Committee (PBC) from entertaining or dealing with the notice of motion of no confidence until the Supreme Court makes a final determination of the Supreme Court reference, which was lodged by my predecessor on the 3rd of December, 2018.”

VoNC motion yet to be screened

Acting Parliamentary Counsel Richard Whitchurch explained this is because the Private Business Committee that screens all private business motions did not sit on Wednesday last week, because parliament was adjourned. The Committee only meets when parliament meets or convenes.

The Committee is chaired by Speaker Job Pomat, the Deputy Speaker and five other elected Members who are not ministers.

Speaker: VoNC motion filed

Speaker Job Pomat, in a press conference after the sitting, said he will now allow due process to take place.

“I have received it. When parliament meets on the 28th (May), it will look at this notice, after it goes through the process of the Private Business Committee,” Pomat said.

He explained that Parliament may not necessarily vote on the 28th but with the motion notice given yesterday afternoon, this will go for the notice paper when parliament next meets.

Timeline of PNG’s VONC

Section 145 of the Constitution has provision for motions of no confidence against any Minister; in this case the Prime Minister.

According to Section 145 of the Constitution, the Vote of No Confidence motion is moved during the 18 months commencing on the date of the appointment of the Prime Minister.

This motion is moved by any member of parliament against the Prime Minister, and must be supported by a number of members of Parliament being not less than one-tenth of the total number of seats in the House; at least 12 members of parliament must support the motion.

Directions hearing for VoNC

The special Supreme Court reference went for directions hearing today before Chief Justice Sir Gibbs Salika.

Any parties interested in joining or intervening in the Special Supreme Court reference have until 21 March to file their respective applications, seeking to join in the reference.

Lawyers acting for the Speaker of Parliament, Clark of Parliament and Leader of the Opposition, Patrick Pruaitch, appeared in court today, along with councils representing the referrer of special Supreme Court reference, Attorney General Steven Davis.

Govt is intact: Duma

Minister for Public Enterprise and State Investments, William Duma, says the current Government remains confident they will survive a Vote of No Confidence.

“The Government is intact and we have the numbers. The Prime Minister enjoys the support of the majority of the numbers,” Duma stated.

Vote of no confidence to be held today in Niue

The Rock's four-day working week and a $2 million budget deficit are among concerns behind the motion.

Five opposition MPs say their concerns around essential services have fallen on deaf ears with the lengthy absences of Premier Talagi on medical grounds.

Opposition MP Terry Coe says he understands the Premier's health is not the best, but it's affecting the running of the country.

TIPNG: MP’s must not lose sight of calls for reform

This was the call by Chairman of Transparency International PNG (TIPNG), Lawrence Stephens following yesterday’s Vote of No Confidence.

"Members have assembled for an important vote and have made a decision.

“This is what legislators are expected to do. Members of Parliament are also representatives of the people and many of the people have been begging parliamentarians to take note of their concerns, “said Stephens.

Stephens added that it should be clear to every politician and public servant by now that the people are concerned.

An observation on vote of no confidence session

Even before the parliamentary staff had arrived with the mace, the government members took their benches together with the Prime Minister.

They were later joined by the Opposition comprising 21 members.

Upon the arrival of the Speaker Theo Zurenuoc and his staff, parliament resumed with prayers.

The Speaker then set the general rules for the session, cautioning MPs to behave and follow standing orders of the day.

He also made it clear that the only item of business for the day was the Motion for the Vote of No Confidence, and nothing else.