Climate Change

Climate change: 'Rising chance' of exceeding 1.5C global target

It assesses a 20 percent chance the threshold will be broken in one year before 2024 and a 70 percent chance it will be broken in one or more months in those five years.

Scientists say it shows the tough task of controlling climate change levels.

The 2015 Paris accord had tasked world leaders with certain goals.

It committed them to pursue efforts to try to keep the world from warming by more than 1.5C this century.

Study finds quarter of climate change tweets from bots

Bots are computer programmes that can masquerade as humans to post or send messages on social media.

Researchers discovered tweets posted by bots created the impression there was a high level of climate change denial.

The paper detailing the finds has not yet been published and was first reported by The Guardian newspaper.

The research team analysed 6.5 million tweets from the period surrounding President Donald Trump's June 2017 announcement that he was removing the United States from the Paris climate accord.

PNG at forefront of climate action

COP25 is a meeting taking place now, over a two week period, in Spain where world leaders and representatives from Governments, civil society experts, youth groups, activists and the private sector are gathering to advance high level policy discussions and take immediate actions on climate change.

It is a formal meeting of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The purpose is to assess global progress in dealing with climate change and to establish legally binding obligations for developed countries to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions.

World Bank to prioritise climate change resilience in Pacific

Its vice president for East Asia and the Pacific, Victoria Kwakwa, was in Tonga last week for talks.

Ms Kwakwa said the World Bank was working closely within Australia's Step Up and New Zealand's Pacific Reset programmes.

"We've been working on several things including supporting countries to strengthen their climate change resilience, working to support policy reforms to build their economic resilience and we're also working together on the connectivity agenda," Ms Kwakwa said.

"As you know, this region is very remote, even compared to other small island states."

Partnership to boost climate change resilience in PNG

Ambassador Catherine Ebert-Gray signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) alongside UNDP’s Resident Representative, Dirk Wagener, to manage and deliver UNDP’s Global Environment Facility Small Grants Programme (GEF SGP) through the United States Agency for International Development’s (USAID) Ready project. 

“The U.S. government believes that every country must be given the opportunity to carve their own path to self-reliance and sustainable development,” said Ambassador Ebert-Gray.

Call for bold move by Australia to improve Pacific relationship

But observers said no substantial change is expected for Australia's engagement in the region after the Coalition's surprise win at the weekend.

Shane McLeod of the Australian think-tank, the Lowy Institute, said Australia's so-called Pacific step up, a suite of policies and funding initiatives brought in in 2017, will likely continue.

But he said with losses on the hard right, there may be more room for the government to manoeuvre on climate change.

Pacific leaders call for urgent global action to reverse climate change

Following a high-level political dialogue with the UN Secretary General, Antonio Guterres in Suva, the leaders issued a statement saying climate change is the ‘single biggest threat to our Blue Pacific region.”

Forum Chair and Nauru President, Baron Waqa read the statement on behalf of the leaders.

The Pacific leaders said all countries must take decisive and transformative action to reduce global emissions and ensure at scale mitigation and adaptation support for those countries that need it.

UN head to mobilise world around Pacific climate needs

Antonio Guterres attended a community roundtable event in Auckland Monday, as he kicked off his Pacific tour.

He departs for Fiji on Tuesday before heading to Tuvalu and Vanuatu to complete his regional tour.

Mr Guterres said the Pacific islands were the first victims of climate change.

"Not only some of them because of the rising level of water represents an existential threat, some might disappear, but also because of course climate change brings with it a lot of negative consequences," he said.

Help reduce climate change effects

This was a key message during a March 22nd panel discussion at the Catholic Bishops Conference in Port Moresby, led by the Social Communications Commission.

Sub Regional Country Representative for Catholic Relief Services, Matthew McGarry, said the issue of climate change was one that needed to be immediately addressed as it was growing, and individually we could do our part to reduce it.

However, McGarry said because climate change was a bigger global issue, it would need actual political intervention to solve the problem.

Sir David Attenborough: Climate change 'our greatest threat'

The broadcaster said it could lead to the collapse of civilisations and the extinction of "much of the natural world".

He was speaking at the opening ceremony of United Nations-sponsored climate talks in Katowice, Poland.

The meeting is the most critical on climate change since the 2015 Paris agreement.

Sir David said: "Right now, we are facing a man-made disaster of global scale. Our greatest threat in thousands of years. Climate change.